dimanche 28 août 2016

EURAMES Info Service 34/2016

CONFERENCES

1. International Congress: "Islam in Plural. Thought, Faith and Society." Université
Catholique, Lyon, 6-9 September 2016
 
2. 7th Annual Conference of the Mid West History Association: "Mapping Migrations in
World History", Metropolitan State University, Saint Paul, MN, 23-24 September 2016

3. Conference: "Fatimids and Umayyads: Competing Caliphates", Institute of Ismaili
Studies, London, 23-25 September 2016

4. Conference: "Left-wing Trends in the Arab World (1948-1979): Bringing the
Transnational Back in", Orient-Institut Beirut, 12-13 December 2016

5. International Conference: "Resistance(s): Between Theories and the Field", Free
University of Brussels, Belgium, 14-15 December 2016 
 
6. Poster Session during Conference: "The Globalization of Science in the Middle
East and North Africa, 18th-20th Centuries", College of the Holy Cross,
Massachusetts, 24-25 March 2017

7. Conference: "Jewish Women´s Cultural Capital under Islam", Israel Institute for
Advanced Studies, Givat Ram, Jerusalem, 12-14 June 2017

8. Fifth European Congress on World and Global History "Ruptures, Empires,
Revolutions", Budapest, 29 August - 2 September 2017


POSITIONS
 
9. Postdoctoral Scholarships: Academy Scholars Program 2017-2018 of the Harvard
Academy for International and Area Studies
 
10. Three Fellowships Offered by the "University of Wisconsin-Madison Mellon
Postdoctoral Program" 
 
11. Research Assistant Vacancy at the  Middle East Centre and Department of Media &
Communications, London School for Economics

12.  Kuwait Programme Short-Term Visiting Research Fellowships, Middle East Centre,
London School of Economics

____________________ 
 

If you want to distribute an announcement via DAVO and EURAMES Info Service (more
than 6000 recipients, only English and French announcements), please apply the usual
format of the text with no more than 50 words and no attachment. Please send only
the most important information to davo@geo.uni-mainz.de and refer to further details
with a link to the respective website or an email address.
 
Best regards,
 
Guenter Meyer, Centre for Research on the Arab World, University of Mainz
 
____________________
 
 
CONFERENCES
 
1. International Congress: "Islam in Plural. Thought, Faith and Society." Université
Catholique, Lyon, 6-9 September 2016
 
Three main topics provide the structure of the congress: current developments in
geopolitics and economics, theological questions underlying interreligious
encounters, and sociological dimensions of intra-islamic pluralism particularly with
respect to the diverse challenges rising from modernity. 
 
Information: http://evenement.pluriel.fuce.eu/en-/; Contact: contact.pluriel@fuce.eu
 
 
______________


2. 7th Annual Conference of the Mid West History Association: "Mapping Migrations in
World History", Metropolitan State University, Saint Paul, MN, 23-24 September 2016

For program (including North African and Muslim migration) and registration see
http://www.mwwha.org/conference-2016.html


______________



3. Conference: "Fatimids and Umayyads: Competing Caliphates", Institute of Ismaili
Studies, London, 23-25 September 2016

 The full program and the abstracts are available at
http://iis.ac.uk/sites/default/files/fatimids_and_umayyads_conference_0.pdf

________________


4. Conference: "Left-wing Trends in the Arab World (1948-1979): Bringing the
Transnational Back in", Orient-Institut Beirut, 12-13 December 2016

This conference is supported by the ERC Program "When Authoritarianism Fails in the
Arab World" (WAFAW). See the detailed program at
www.orient-institut.org/fileadmin/user_upload/ARAL_Programme_FINAL.pdf

________________
 
 
5. International Conference: "Resistance(s): Between Theories and the Field", Free
University of Brussels, Belgium, 14-15 December 2016 
 
We welcome empirically-grounded case studies as well as theoretical (and/or)
epistemological reflections on topics from mass public protests during the Arab
Springs to individual disobedience from whistle blowers and to resistance and social
change. Financial support is possible.
 
Deadline for abstracts in English or French: 15 October 2016. Information:
resistancesULB@gmail.com 
 
 
______________


6. Poster Session during Conference: "The Globalization of Science in the Middle
East and North Africa, 18th-20th Centuries", College of the Holy Cross,
Massachusetts, 24-25 March 2017

Conference participants will present papers, which consider the nature of encounters
between Islamic societies and the west as the balance of power between these regions
shifted in the favor of Europe, including the role of science in modernization and
development in the MENA region.

Deadline for abstracts of posters: 30 September 2016. Information:
https://networks.h-et.org/node/73374/announcements/140231/call-posters-poster-session-globalization-science-middle-east


______________
 
 
7. Conference: "Jewish Women´s Cultural Capital under Islam", Israel Institute for
Advanced Studies, Givat Ram, Jerusalem, 12-14 June 2017
 
By examining the lives of Jewish women across the Muslim world from the Middle Ages
until the modern period, we will focus attention on varieties of women's cultural
capital and offer comparative perspectives.
 
Deadline for abstracts: 1 November 2016. Information:
http://ias.huji.ac.il/content/jewish-women%E2%80%99s-cultural-capital-under-islam
 
 
______________


8. Fifth European Congress on World and Global History "Ruptures, Empires,
Revolutions", Budapest, 29 August - 2 September 2017

On the occasion of the centennial of the Russian Revolution, the conference will
discuss the global context and repercussions of the revolution in particular while
debating the role of revolutions in global history in general. "Connected histories
of the Eastern Mediterranean and Arab world at large" will be one of the topics. 

Deadline for abstracts: 15 November 2016. Information:
http://research.uni-leipzig.de/eniugh/congress/

______________
 
 
STELLENANGEBOTE / POSITIONS
 
9. Postdoctoral Scholarships: Academy Scholars Program 2017-2018 of the Harvard
Academy for International and Area Studies
 
The program supports outstanding scholars at the start of their careers whose work
combines disciplinary excellence in the social sciences (including history and law)
with a command of the language, history, or culture of non-Western countries or
regions. Their scholarship may elucidate domestic, comparative, or transnational
issues, past or present. 
 
Deadline for application: 1 October 2016. Information:
http://www.h-net.org/jobs/job_display.php?id=53348
 
 
______________
 
 
10. Three Fellowships Offered by the "University of Wisconsin-Madison Mellon
Postdoctoral Program" 
 
The theme for 2017-2019 applicants is "Translation, Adaptation, Transplantation." We
seek applications from scholars across the humanities and humanistic social sciences
whose research addresses theories and practices of translation in intercultural and
transcultural contact zones and transnational circulations.
 
Deadline for application: 1 November 2016. Information:
http://humanities.wisc.edu/fellows/about-the-a-w-mellon-postoctoral-program/application-information
  
______________


11. Research Assistant Vacancy at the  Middle East Centre and Department of Media &
Communications, London School for Economics
The successful candidate will join a multi-country collaboration project with the
American University of Sharjah, 'Personalised Media and Participatory Culture'. The
project has field sites in Morocco, Jordan, Tunisia and the UAE. The candidate is
required to assist Dr Shakuntala Banaji in analysing, organising and disseminating
the research outputs.

Deadline for application:  2 September 2016. Information:
http://us2.campaign-archive2.com/?u=3d36dd6f1efd9e75e763f1bb9&id=87c9679dd9&e=2e4e4b53c8


____________________


12.  Kuwait Programme Short-Term Visiting Research Fellowships, Middle East Centre,
London School of Economics

Applications are invited from GCC nationals who have a PhD or equivalent and wish to
develop their research capacity and output. Based in the Middle East Centre, the
fellowships will enable the successful candidates to pursue research relevant to the
Kuwait Programme for a period of up to three months.

Deadline for application:  5 September 2016. Information:
http://us2.campaign-archive2.com/?u=3d36dd6f1efd9e75e763f1bb9&id=87c9679dd9&e=2e4e4b53c8

Christian Augé, 1943-19 Αυγούστου 2016. Αιωνία του η μνήμη.

Christian Augé in memoriam http://www.ifporient.org/node/1831
Nous avons la grande tristesse d'apprendre que Christian Augé, directeur de recherches honoraire au CNRS, est décédé vendredi 19 août 2016. Né en 1943 dans une famille originaire de la région de Nîmes, Christian avait fait des études supérieures de lettres classiques, notamment à l'École normale supérieure, qui l'avaient conduit dès ses premiers pas dans la recherche à se tourner vers l'archéologie, tout spécialement l'iconographie gréco-romaine et orientale et la numismatique. Une expatriation comme coopérant en Libye puis de très nombreux séjours au Proche-Orient firent rapidement de lui un spécialiste des rives sud-est et orientale de la Méditerranée et de leur arrière-pays. Chercheur au CNRS durant toute sa carrière professionnelle, il y fut longuement l'une des principales chevilles ouvrières françaises du LIMC, le Lexicon iconographicum mythologiae classicae, cette monumentale entreprise internationale qui, en quelques décennies, produisit l'exhaustif dictionnaire multilingue richement illustré, en de nombreux volumes, qui porte le même nom — certes pas limité à l'imagerie de la mythologie des Grecs et des Romains au sens étroit, mais grand ouvert sur les cultures voisines ou parfois moins voisines. C. Augé, précisément, y fut l'artisan d'un fort grand nombre de notices consacrées aux divinités de l'Orient autour de la longue époque hellénistique et romaine.
Mais c'est plus encore sans doute dans son autre grande spécialité, la numismatique, qu'il a marqué pendant plus de quatre décennies le monde des historiens, archéologues et épigraphistes du Proche-Orient et de la péninsule arabique : par l'ampleur, d'une part, de sa culture et de sa pratique numismatiques, qui lui permettait d'identifier et étudier aussi bien des monnaies impériales romaines ou byzantines que des émissions de petites villes ou de royaumes indigènes ou encore d'illisibles petits bronzes aux images très dégradées issues du répertoire grec, émises dans des recoins perdus de l'Arabie à des dates difficilement cernables. Mais aussi, d'autre part, par sa participation comme numismate à tant et tant de missions libano- ou syro- ou jordano- ou saoudo-européenne, voire américaines — une participation qu'on aurait volontiers dite infatigable si elle n'avait été épuisante, sa santé étant fragile depuis sa jeunesse. Particulièrement bon connaisseur et amateur de la Jordanie, des Nabatéens et de Pétra, Christian se dévoua pendant plus de dix ans, à partir du début des années 2000, pour diriger la mission archéologique française consacrée au grand sanctuaire du centre de Pétra, le Qasr el-Bint, où il eut le bonheur de présider à quelques découvertes sensationnelles, dont celle d'une magnifique tête en marbre de l'empereur romain et philosophe stoïcien Marc Aurèle. Dans cette période, Christian fit longuement partie de l'Ifpo en son antenne d'Amman, où le CNRS l'avait détaché pour qu'il fût au plus près de ses terrains. Retraité, il continua à résider en partie dans cette Jordanie qu'il aimait tant, en compagnie de son épouse Hélène, ouvrant largement les portes de leur logis d'Amman à bien des jeunes savants ou étudiants.
D'une très grande générosité, particulièrement affable, faisant volontiers partager à ses collègues et aux plus jeunes son érudition, C. Augé prit, aussi, largement sa part des tâches collectives et responsabilités, notamment en siégeant au comité national du CNRS ou en présidant la Société française d'archéologie classique. Après son long séjour au sein du LIMC — un laboratoire qu'il quitta avant que le LIMC fût rattaché au grand laboratoire ArScAn — il entra dans ArScAn (l'UMR «Archéologie & sciences de l'Antiquité», au sein de la Maison de l'Archéologie et de l'Ethnologie de Nanterre), où il dirigea pendant une dizaine d'années à partir du milieu des années 1990 sans ménager sa peine l'équipe d'Archéologie du Proche-Orient Hellénistique et Romain.
À la MAE comme à l'Ifpo, mais aussi chez nombre de nos collègues du Proche-Orient et des pays européens, le décès de cet érudit pointilleux et de cet homme très aimé laisse un grand vide. Sit tibi terra levis, Christian — Allah yarhamhu.
François Villeneuve, directeur élu d'ArScAn, président du conseil scientifique de l'Ifpo.

mardi 23 août 2016

5ο Παγκόσμιο Συνέδριο Μεσανατολικών Σπουδών, 16-20 Ιουλίου 2018, Σεβίλλη...


Dear colleagues and friends,

The date of the Fifth World Congress for Middle Eastern Studies (WOCMES) in Sevilla/Spain has just been announced by the organizers: 16-20 July 2018!

If you are involved in the organization of any other conferences in Summer 2018, please make sure that there is no overlapping with the most important international congress of Middle East studies in 2018.

Kind regards

Guenter Meyer
Chairman of the International Advisory Council of WOCMES

dimanche 21 août 2016

EURAMES Info Service 33/2016

CONFERENCES
  
1. Media Studies Research Design Workshop for Graduate Students from the Arab
Region, Combined with Conference: "Rethinking Media through the Middle East”,
American University of Beirut, 14 January 2017
 
2. International Symposium: “The Fatwā System and Fatwā Books in the Ottoman Empire
and India”, New Delhi, 14-15 January 2017
 
3. Congress of the Mediterranean Studies Association, University of Valletta, Malta,
31 May-3 June 2017
 
 
POSITIONS
 
4. University Lectureship in International Relations of Modern Iran, Leiden University
 
5. Stipendiary Junior (Postdoctoral) Research Fellowships in Urban Studies, King’s
College, Cambridge
 
6. Assistant Professor in the Department of History (tenure-track), Willamette
University, Salem, Oregon
 
7. Assistant Professor in Classical Islam (tenure-track), Brandeis University,
Waltham, Massachusetts
 
8. Assistant Professor for Middle East / Islamic World, University of West Georgia
 
9. Assistant Professor of Middle Eastern History, Salisbury University, Maryland
 
10. Manager Director's Office of the Center for Conflict and Humanitarian Studies
(CHS), Doha Institute for Graduate Studies, Qatar
 
11. Assistant/Associate Professor in International Relations, King Fahd University
of Petroleum and Minerals, Dahran
 
 
OTHER INFORMATION
 
12. Articles for “Middle East Studies Center Working Papers”, American University in
Cairo

__________________
 
If you want to distribute an announcement via EURAMES Info Service (more than 6000
recipients, only English and French announcements), please apply the usual format of
the text with no more than 50 words and no attachment. Please send only the most
important information to  and refer to further details with a
link to the respective website or an email address.
 
Best regards,
 
Guenter Meyer, Center for Research on the Arab World (CERAW), University of Mainz
 
____________________
 
 
CONFERENCES
 
1. Media Studies Research Design Workshop for Graduate Students from the Arab
Region, Combined with Conference: "Rethinking Media through the Middle East”,
American University of Beirut, 14 January 2017
 
This workshop is organized by AUB and the Arab Council for the Social Sciences
(ACSS). It will give MA students at the thesis proposal stage and beyond, and early
PhD students, the opportunity to work with senior scholars to develop their research
design and methodology. 
 
Deadline for applications: 2 September 2016. Information:
http://www.aub.edu.lb/fas/sbs/media_studies/Pages/News.aspx
 
 
______________
 
 
2. International Symposium: “The Fatwā System and Fatwā Books in the Ottoman Empire
and India”, New Delhi, 14-15 January 2017
 
The symposium aims to elaborate on the Fatwā system and Fatwā books that were
produced by Indian and Ottoman ulama. Participants will be reimbursed for
accommodation costs.
 
Submission of Abstracts: 15 September 2016. Information:
http://www.ifa-india.org/english.php; contact: 
 
 
______________
 
 
3. Congress of the Mediterranean Studies Association, University of Valletta, Malta,
31 May-3 June 2017
 
We are now accepting proposals for individual paper presentations, panel
discussions, and complete sessions on all subjects related to the Mediterranean
region and Mediterranean cultures around the world from all historical periods. The
official language of the Congress is English, but we also welcome complete sessions
in any Mediterranean language.
 
Deadline for abstracts: 1 February 2017. Information:
http://us9.campaign-archive2.com/?u=e1ae5bef9757e58afec01a89a&id=20f99281f5&e=82aeb6c61d
 
 
______________
 
 
POSITIONS
 
4. University Lectureship in International Relations of Modern Iran, Leiden University
 
Four-year replacement position for a period from September 2016 or as soon as
possible thereafter. Vacancy number: 16-249.
 
Deadline for application: 1 September 2016. Information:

 
 
______________
 
 
5. Stipendiary Junior (Postdoctoral) Research Fellowships in Urban Studies, King’s
College, Cambridge
 
King’s College wishes to appoint with effect from 1st October 2017 for 4 years one
or more Junior Research Fellow/s with a research interest in the social and cultural
life of cities and intellectual curiosity concerning the synergies between
socio-cultural anthropology, human geography and architecture. The competition is
not limited to any region of the world. 
 
Deadline for application:  15 September 2016. Information:
http://www.kings.cam.ac.uk/research/junior-research-fellowships.html 
 
 
______________
 
 
6. Assistant Professor in the Department of History (tenure-track), Willamette
University, Salem, Oregon
 
The position is beginning August 2017. We seek candidates with combined teaching and
research expertise in transnational history with an area of focus in Latin America,
Africa, the Middle East.
 
Application Deadline: 23 September 2016.Information:
https://jobs.willamette.edu/postings/2121
 
 
______________
 
 
7. Assistant Professor in Classical Islam (tenure-track), Brandeis University,
Waltham, Massachusetts
 
The position is to begin in Fall 2017. The successful candidate must have primary
research interests and training in Classical Islam (e.g., Qur’an and tafsir,
history, philosophy, Sufism, literature, etc.). 
 
Deadline for application: 14 October 2016. Information:
https://academicjobsonline.org/ajo/jobs/7635
 
 
______________
 
 
8. Assistant Professor for Middle East / Islamic World, University of West Georgia
 
The position will start fall 2017. Responsibilities include teaching a world history
survey, a survey of the Middle East or the Islamic World, as well as advanced
undergraduate courses and graduate seminars in the candidate's area of
specialization.
 
Deadline for application: 1 November 2016. Information:
http://www.h-net.org/jobs/job_display.php?id=53297
 
 
______________
 
 
9. Assistant Professor of Middle Eastern History, Salisbury University, Maryland
 
Teaching includes World Civilizations, History of the Middle East, and graduate
courses for the M.A. in History program.
 
Deadline for application: 15 October 2016. Information:
http://www.h-net.org/jobs/job_display.php?id=53303
 
 
______________
 
 
10. Manager Director's Office of the Center for Conflict and Humanitarian Studies
(CHS), Doha Institute for Graduate Studies, Qatar
 
CHS is an inter-disciplinary research and study center that conducts original and
rigorous research on conflict, humanitarian crisis, state fragility and war to peace
transitions in the Middle East and North Africa. 
 
For a full job description see
http://%20www.dohainstitute.edu.qa/En/Careers/Pages/NonAcademicApply.aspx?&JobId=DIHR011
 
 
______________
 
 
11. Assistant/Associate Professor in International Relations, King Fahd University
of Petroleum and Minerals, Dahran
 
Candidates with Middle East expertise and experience are encouraged to apply.
Applicants are expected to be proficient in English.
 
Position will remain vacant until filled. Information: http://www.kfupm.edu.sa; then
click on jobs link; contact 
 
 
______________
 
 
OTHER INFORMATION
 
12. Master-Studiengang Asienwissenschaften: "Schwerpunkt Türkische Geschichte und
Gesellschaft",  Universität Bonn
 
In vier Semestern erwerben die Studierenden durch die Verbindung von Quellenlektüre
und wissenschaftlicher Literatur einen Überblick über die gesellschaftlichen und
historischen Entwicklungen im Osmanischen Reich vom 19. Jahrhundert bis zur
Gegenwart.
 
Bewerbung bis zum 1. September 2016. Informationen:
http://www.ioa.uni-bonn.de/abteilungen/islamwissenschaft/studium/ma-islamwissenschaft/tuerkische-geschichte-und-gesellschaft
 
 
______________
 
 
13. Articles for “Middle East Studies Center Working Papers”, American University in
Cairo
 
The Working Paper Series contributes to international social science and humanities
scholarship on the Middle East and wider Islamic world, from the seventh century to
the present. Papers of between 7000 and 10,000 words are invited. 
 
Submissions accepted on a rolling basis. Information:
http://schools.aucegypt.edu/GAPP/mesc/Pages/Working%20Paper%20Series.aspx 
 

vendredi 19 août 2016

σχετικά με τις αρχές του Ισλαμικού Δικαίου. LES FONDEMENTS MÉDIÉVAUX DU DROIT MUSULMAN

ENTRETIEN AVEC MATHIEU TILLIER – LES FONDEMENTS MÉDIÉVAUX DU DROIT MUSULMAN 
ARTICLE PUBLIÉ LE 18/08/2016

http://www.lesclesdumoyenorient.com/Entretien-avec-Mathieu-Tillier-Les-fondements-medievaux-du-droit-musulman.html
Mathieu Tillier, professeur d’histoire de l’Islam médiéval à l’Université Paris-Sorbonne, est notamment l’auteur de Les cadis d’Iraq et l’État abbasside, (Damas, Presses de l’Ifpo, 2009) (en ligne : http://books.openedition.org/ifpo/673?lang=fr).
Ses principaux travaux portent sur l’histoire du droit et de la justice aux premiers siècles de l’Islam. Ils peuvent être consultés sur HAL-SHS :
https://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/search/index/q/*/authFullName_s/Mathieu+Tillier

Qu’appelle-t-on la « charia » ?

L’islam se présente comme une religion de la Loi, à l’instar d’autres religions comme le judaïsme. En tant que souverain de l’univers, Dieu est supposé imposer des règles à Ses créatures. Les prophètes de l’Ancien Testament, à commencer par Adam, ont eu pour principale mission de transmettre cette Loi aux hommes. Aux yeux des musulmans, le dernier des prophètes, Muhammad, en a reçu la version finale. Vivre en accord avec la volonté divine représente une part essentielle de la pratique religieuse : pour obtenir le salut dans l’au-delà, pour gagner le Paradis, les musulmans sont invités à suivre le « chemin droit », à adopter un comportement conforme aux prescriptions divines. Cette voie droite est ce que l’on appelle couramment la « charia ». Ce terme arabe désignait à l’origine le chemin qui, dans le désert, mène au point d’eau. Il est employé de manière métaphorique pour signifier qu’il n’est point de salut en dehors de cette voie : le berger qui s’en écarterait passerait à côté du point d’eau, et périrait tout en perdant son troupeau. Cette idée de voie normative tracée par Dieu est donc indissociable de celle de salut éternel.
Les juristes musulmans du Moyen Âge parlent pourtant assez peu de « charia » : ils préfèrent utiliser le terme shar‘, forgé sur la même racine, ou évoquer les « règles » établies par Dieu (sesahkâm ; ou ses hudûd lorsqu’il s’agit des châtiments prévus pour certains crimes). L’emploi du terme charia s’est d’abord développé dans les communautés juives et chrétiennes arabophones du Proche-Orient pour désigner leur propre religion. Pour les juifs, par exemples, la « charia » n’est autre que la Torah.

La charia est-elle donc équivalente au droit musulman ?

La « charia » n’est pas équivalente au droit musulman. La charia est la Loi idéale, décrétée par Dieu. Néanmoins les hommes n’ont pas d’accès direct à cette Loi, qu’ils ne peuvent qu’approcher de diverses manières. La première consiste à s’appuyer sur ce que Dieu est supposé dire Lui-même. Les musulmans considèrent le Coran comme Sa parole révélée et se fondent donc sur lui pour approcher Sa volonté. Mais le Coran ne suffit pas. Le premier problème est qu’il ne comporte qu’un nombre limité de prescriptions à valeur normative, quelques centaines de versets au total, permettant notamment d’établir l’interdiction de l’adultère, quelques règles relatives au mariage, aux successions… Le second problème est que certains versets normatifs sont ambigus. Par exemple, le vin n’est pas prohibé de manière claire dans le Coran : il est présenté comme un péché (Coran, 2 : 219), mais un autre verset sous-entend que la prière ne doit pas être effectuée en état d’ivresse (Coran, 4 : 46), ce qui pourrait impliquer que le vin n’est pas interdit dans l’absolu. Le Coran ne permet donc pas à lui-seul de déduire la volonté divine. Or les musulmans le considèrent comme l’ultime discours de Dieu aux hommes : nul prophète ne peut venir les éclairer à nouveau sur les exigences de leur Créateur. Les musulmans doivent donc exercer leur réflexion pour approcher Sa Loi. C’est cette approche par le biais de la pensée humaine, qualifiée de fiqh par les musulmans (« connaissance, compréhension »), qui constitue le droit musulman. Quand on parle aujourd’hui de musulmans qui réclament « l’application de la charia », cela n’a donc pas de sens : la charia demeure un modèle idéal inaccessible. Les normes que les juristes musulmans ont élaborées au cours des âges sont relatives : jamais ils n’ont prétendu avoir accès à la volonté divine, et ils sont toujours demeurés pleinement conscients du caractère relatif des normes qu’ils tentaient de définir.

Quelles sont les autres sources du droit musulman ? Comment le corpus a-t-il évolué avec le temps ?

Les musulmans ont mis plus de deux siècles pour élaborer des méthodes pérennes permettant de déduire la norme juridique. Dans le monde musulman médiéval classique, le droit repose sur des sources hiérarchisées. Vient d’abord le Coran, parole de Dieu. Si le Coran est silencieux sur un point, c’est celle du prophète Muhammad qui est examinée : en tant que messager de Dieu, son discours et sa pratique font autorité. Selon les musulmans, Dieu ne l’aurait pas laissé dire ou faire quelque chose de contraire à Sa volonté. C’est ce que l’on appelle la sunna, dont le matériau de base est constitué de hadiths, des dits attribués au prophète. Si la sunna est elle aussi silencieuse sur une question, la troisième source du droit est le consensus de la communauté des savants musulmans, appelé ijmâ‘. Les musulmans considèrent en effet que Dieu ne laisserait pas l’ensemble de ses savants se fourvoyer de manière unanime. Enfin, si même le consensus ne permet pas de répondre à une question, les juristes peuvent pratiquer l’analogie : déduire une règle à partir d’une autre. Ainsi, la consommation de cannabis n’est interdite ni par le Coran, ni par la sunna, ni par le consensus des anciens savants musulmans. Mais ses effets peuvent être assimilés à ceux du vin : c’est sur cette base que certains le considèrent aujourd’hui comme prohibé.

Est-ce sur ces bases que les musulmans conçurent leur droit dès l’origine ?

Cette théorie systématique est assez tardive. Elle commence à apparaître au VIIIe siècle, mais ne se développe sur des bases solides qu’au début du IXe siècle, avec le juriste al-Shâfi‘î, fondateur éponyme de l’école juridique chaféite. Cette théorie des fondements du droit participe d’un processus de « traditionalisation », c’est-à-dire d’une quête de fondements scripturaires remontant au prophète de l’Islam, afin de donner autorité aux normes discutées à l’époque par les musulmans.
Ce n’est pas la vision du droit qui prévalait au premier siècle de l’Islam, notamment sous la dynastie des Omeyyades (661-750). À cette époque-là, les dits du prophète étaient déjà transmis par oral, mais ils n’étaient pas encore considérés comme une source essentielle du droit. La « sunna du prophète » demeurait une abstraction, tout comme le terme « charia ». Elle apparaissait comme une coutume idéale, mais sans fondement scripturaire. Les premiers musulmans cherchaient concrètement la norme islamique auprès des hommes pieux de la communauté : leurs contemporains, ou ceux des générations antérieures. Ce sont ainsi les savants de la génération des « Successeurs », voire de celle des « Compagnons » (ceux qui eurent l’occasion de voir le prophète, même s’ils étaient enfants à l’époque de sa prédication), qui représentaient les principaux modèles de comportements. Ils incarnaient ce que certains historiens qualifient de « tradition vivante » : en copiant leur attitude et en respectant leurs conseils, l’on se conformait à la « sunna du prophète ». Pour ne prendre qu’un seul exemple : la prière apparaît dès le début de l’Islam comme une obligation légale liant l’homme à Dieu. Mais comment prie-t-on ? Rien ne vient le préciser dans le Coran. La manière de prier des musulmans, et les discussions sur certains détails de ce rituel, proviennent avant tout de l’observation des gestes réalisés par les premières générations de musulmans.

Quels sont les grands juristes fondateurs de ce droit ?

Les grands juristes de l’époque omeyyade sont souvent oubliés aujourd’hui, alors que, par leur réflexion, ils ont largement contribué à forger les catégories juridiques employées par la suite. Beaucoup n’étaient que de simples particuliers, vivant dans les grandes cités du Proche-Orient comme Kufa, Basra et Médine. Certains furent aussi des figures administratives importantes de l’empire omeyyade, et se virent confier des responsabilités judiciaires en tant que cadis. Parmi les hommes qui, en vertu de l’autorité reconnue à leur parole, contribuèrent le plus à modeler le droit musulman, il convient de mentionner les souverains de la communauté : les califes de la dynastie omeyyade (661-750), dont le rôle juridique a plus tard été occulté en raison de son inadéquation au modèle classique des fondements du droit. Le rôle de ces califes est d’autant plus important qu’ils se considéraient comme les représentants de Dieu sur terre : ils étaientkhalîfat Allâh (« lieutenant de Dieu »), plutôt que khalîfa rasûl Allâh (« successeur de l’Envoyé de Dieu ») comme la tradition l’expliquera de manière rétroactive. Cela signifie que les califes du premier siècle de l’Islam se considéraient non seulement comme garant du respect de la Loi divine, mais qu’ils revendiquaient eux-mêmes une capacité à dire le droit. Les sources de l’islam sunnite préservent surtout le souvenir de la législation du deuxième calife, ‘Umar, qui passe notamment pour l’inventeur de la peine de lapidation en cas d’adultère, non prévue par le Coran. Plus tard, les califes omeyyades diffusèrent des ordonnances dans l’ensemble de l’empire par l’intermédiaire de leurs gouverneurs et de leurs juges. L’idée que le pouvoir pouvait dire le droit a ensuite été réfutée par la tradition sunnite, car elle n’est pas conforme à l’idée d’une révélation complètement close à la mort de Muhammad. Elle a néanmoins perduré dans le droit chiite, qui est en grande partie fondé sur la parole des Imams, descendants de ‘Alî, cousin et gendre de Muhammad – bien que la plupart de ces Imams n’aient exercé qu’une autorité spirituelle sur leurs partisans.
Aujourd’hui, l’on retient surtout les noms des juristes qui furent regardés comme les fondateurs de véritables « écoles juridiques » : Abû Hanîfa, un savant de Kufa mort en 765 (fondateur supposé du courant hanéfite) ; Mâlik, savant de Médine mort en 767 ; al-Shâfi‘î, qui fut actif à Bagdad puis en Égypte et mourut en 820 ; Ibn Hanbal, un Bagdadien mort en 855. Il y eut encore bien d’autres fondateurs d’« écoles » qui recueillirent moins de succès, et disparurent dans le courant du Moyen Âge. Ce qu’il est important de retenir, c’est que le droit musulman était conçu comme un système pluraliste : les juristes de chaque école pensaient pouvoir approcher la loi divine de plus près que ceux des autres écoles, mais les divergences doctrinales étaient néanmoins acceptées comme une des spécificités de l’Islam. La science juridique était une science inexacte, et les savants débattaient sans qualifier d’hérétiques ceux qui défendaient une position juridique différente.

Quel fut l’impact du droit musulman sur les pratiques gouvernementales au Moyen Âge ?

À l’époque abbasside (entre 750 et 1258), le droit musulman devient avant tout une affaire de juristes « privés », c’est-à-dire de savants qui exercent leur réflexion juridique en dehors de tout cadre imposé par l’État. Au IXe siècle, le calife est finalement obligé de reconnaître que le domaine du droit lui échappe. Il n’est plus, en la matière, que le garant de l’application du droit tel qu’il est théorisé par les juristes. Le pouvoir nomme des cadis, juges qu’il charge de trancher les litiges sur la base du droit musulman élaboré par les savants. Ces juges étaient le plus souvent eux-mêmes des savants et, bien que désignés par le pouvoir, ils revendiquaient une grande indépendance dans leur pratique judiciaire quotidienne : ils devaient pouvoir s’appuyer sur la tradition savante, et non sur les instructions du calife ou d’autres hommes de pouvoir, pour gérer les affaires des musulmans. Cette justice de cadis est parfois qualifiée de « religieuse », car elle se fonde sur le fiqh et ambitionne d’être le plus conforme possible à la charia.
Mais il a toujours existé des formes de justice alternatives. Le gouvernant qui, au quotidien, déléguait son pouvoir judiciaire à ses cadis, gardait la possibilité de rendre lui-même la justice. Les califes omeyyades, puis abbassides, tenaient des audiences plus ou moins régulières dans le cadre des mazâlim (littéralement le « redressement des injustices »). Ce tribunal supérieur, expression de la justice du souverain, examinait notamment les plaintes contre les agents de l’État coupables d’exactions. Cette justice trouva son plein épanouissement à partir du XIIe siècle, lorsque de véritable « palais de justice » furent édifiés en Orient pour recevoir le tribunal des sultans zenguides, ayyoubides et mamelouks.
Cette justice est parfois qualifiée de « séculière », car elle ne reposait que très partiellement sur le fiqh. En effet, le souverain n’était pas tenu de se conformer à la lettre au droit musulman théorisé par les juristes privés. Celui-ci est très contraignant pour les cadis : par exemple, il n’autorise pas le juge à mener des enquêtes pour découvrir la vérité, et il interdit le recours à la torture. Dans un souci d’efficacité, les souverains de l’islam se sont souvent détachés de telles règles pour recourir à des systèmes normatifs concurrents : notamment ce que l’on appelle la siyâsa, qui selon certains polémistes de l’époque mamelouke était inspirée de la coutume mongole.

De manière plus générale, quel est l’héritage aujourd´hui de ce droit médiéval ?

Le droit islamique élaboré au cours du Moyen Âge est à la base des normes religieuses contemporaines. Il reste encore essentiel pour tout ce qui concerne les relations entre la créature et le Créateur, c’est-à-dire les rites comme la prière, le jeûne, le pèlerinage à La Mecque, etc. Les musulmans suivent les préceptes d’une des écoles juridiques sunnites, chiites ou kharijites. Les Maghrébins adhèrent en majorité à l’école qui se réclame de Mâlik, le malikisme, depuis que celle-ci s’est durablement implantée en Afrique du Nord et dans la péninsule Ibérique au IXe siècle. En Arabie saoudite, c’est une forme de hanbalisme, dans une version réformée à l’époque moderne, le wahhabisme, qui prédomine aujourd’hui.
En ce qui concerne les autres domaines du droit, celui qui régit les relations entre les hommes (droit matrimonial, successoral, commercial, pénal, etc.), il continue d’être source d’inspiration, en théorie, pour de nombreux États à majorité musulmane. Mais dans la pratique, les codes civils et pénaux de ces États sont bien plus influencés par les codifications européennes du XIXe siècle que par le fiqhmédiéval. La plupart des mouvements fondamentalistes qui réclament l’application de la « charia » sont en réalité en rupture avec la tradition savante élaborée tout au long du Moyen Âge et à l’époque moderne : leurs tenants revendiquent la capacité de revenir aux textes fondateurs pour les interpréter, rejetant par-là la tradition juridique ancienne et son relativisme.

lundi 15 août 2016

EURAMES Info Service 32/2016

CONFERENCES
 
1. Panel on “The July 15, 2016 Coup Attempt in Turkey as Event and as Process”,
Annual Meeting of the American Anthropological Association, Minneapolis MN, 17 or 18
November 2016
 
2. Conference: “Mysticism in Comparative Perspective”, Glasgow University, 14-16
December 2016
 
3. Third ACSS Conference: "State, Sovereignty and Social Space in the Arab Region:
Emerging Historical and Theoretical Approaches", Beirut, 10-12 March 2017 
 
4. Third Gulf Studies Symposium: "Mobilities and Materialities of the Gulf and
Arabian Peninsula", American University in Kuwait, 17-19 March 2017
 
5. Conference: "Mediterranean Cultures and Societies Knowledge, Health and Tourism",
Faro, Portugal, 4-5 May 2017
 
6. The 12th Conference of AIDA (Association Internationale de Dialectologie
Arabe), Aix Marseille University, 18-20 May 2017
 
7. Atelier thématique "L'irrationnel au Moyen-Orient et en Islam" IIe 2ème Congrès
du GIS "Moyen-Orient et mondes musulmans",  l'INALCO, Paris,  7 Juillet 2017
 
 
POSITIONS
 
8. 3 PhD candidates in Middle East Studies (Arabic), Leiden University 
 
9. Assistant Professor of Political Science Specializing in Comparative Politics,
Stockton University, Galloway, NJ
 
10. Assistant Professor, Modern Middle Eastern History, University of Massachusetts
Amherst 
 
11. Assistant Professor or Instructor in the History of the Islamic World/Middle
East (tenure-track),  Franklin & Marshall College, Lancaster, Pennsylvania
 
12. Faculty Positions for Social Research and Public Policy, New York University,
Abu Dhabi
 
 
OTHER INFORMATION
 
13. Articles on “Frontiers of Contemporary Research on the Middle East and North
Africa” for "APSA MENA Newsletter"

__________________ 
 
If you want to distribute an announcement via DAVO-Info-Service and EURAMES Info
Service (more than 6000 recipients, only English and French announcements), please
apply the usual format of the text with no more than 50 words and no attachment.
Please send only the most important information to  and
refer to further details with a link to the respective website or an email address.
 
Best regards,
 
Guenter Meyer, Centre for Research on the Arab World (CERAW), University of Mainz
 
____________________
 
 
CONFERENCES
 
1. Panel on “The July 15, 2016 Coup Attempt in Turkey as Event and as Process”,
Annual Meeting of the American Anthropological Association, Minneapolis MN, 17 or 18
November 2016
 
This panel brings together the work of anthropologists who consider the July 15 coup
attempt, both in its irreducible singularity as an event and as part of
socio-political processes that extend far beyond the horizon of a
single Friday night.  
 
The deadline for this late-breaking session is 15 August 2016. Information:
http://www.americananthro.org/AttendEvents/Content.aspx?ItemNumber=20537&navItemNumber=566;
contact: Zeynep Gürsel () and Ruken Şengül
()
 
 
______________
 
 
2. Conference: “Mysticism in Comparative Perspective”, Glasgow University, 14-16
December 2016
 
The conference seeks to renew the project of a comparative study of mysticism and in
doing so to offer resources for both teaching and research in theology and religious
studies. Proposals under the following headings are especially welcome: Methodology,
Annihilation, Love/Union, Material Culture, and Syncretism.
 
Deadline for abstracts: 15 September 2016. Information:
http://users.ox.ac.uk/%7Erege0676/Glasgow%20Conference.html
 
 
______________
 
 
3. Third ACSS Conference: "State, Sovereignty and Social Space in the Arab Region:
Emerging Historical and Theoretical Approaches", Beirut, 10-12 March 2017 
 
The conference will be organized around three major axes: Transformations of State
and of Forms of Sovereignty -- Social Space and Power -- Political Geography of
Refugees and Displaced Populations.
 
Deadline for abstracts: 6 September 2016. Information:
www.theacss.org/pages/third-conference
 
 
______________
 
 
4. Third Gulf Studies Symposium: "Mobilities and Materialities of the Gulf and
Arabian Peninsula", American University in Kuwait, 17-19 March 2017
 
The 2017 GSS will bring together international and regional scholars to engage in an
interdisciplinary discussion on the movement of people into, out of, across, and
within the Gulf and Arabian Peninsula in historical and contemporary contexts, and
the various material forms that enable, restrict, or are produced by these
mobilities.
 
Deadline for abstracts: 15 October 2016. Information:
www.auk.edu.kw/cgs/gss/gss_2017.jsp
 
 
______________
 
 
5. Conference: "Mediterranean Cultures and Societies Knowledge, Health and Tourism",
Faro, Portugal, 4-5 May 2017
 
The Conference is open to contributions that address the great questions concerning
the Mediterranean, the cultures and the societies developed on its shores.
 
Deadline for abstracts: 15 October 2016. Information:
http://us9.campaign-archive1.com/?u=e1ae5bef9757e58afec01a89a&id=e573ae2598&e=dae849782c
 
 
______________
 
 
6. The 12th Conference of AIDA (Association Internationale de Dialectologie
Arabe), Aix Marseille University, 18-20 May 2017
 
Papers on all sub-fields of Arabic dialectology are welcome: dialectal geography,
specific aspects of phonology morphology and syntax, code-switching, koine language,
pidgin, creole, the lexicon of Arabic dialects, dialectal atlases, sociolinguistics,
teaching of Arabic dialects, and so on.
 
Deadline for abstracts: 30 October 2016. Information:
http://aidabucharest2015.lls.unibuc.ro/?page_id=540
 
 
______________
 
 
7. Atelier thématique "L'irrationnel au Moyen-Orient et en Islam" IIe 2ème Congrès
du GIS "Moyen-Orient et mondes musulmans",  l'INALCO, Paris,  7 Juillet 2017 
 
Des travaux portant sur toutes les époques de l'histoire du Moyen-Orient et de
l'Islām et mobilisant plusieurs domaines (philosophie, théologie, littérature,
sciences sociales, anthropologie, jurisprudence, histoire, médecine, sciences,
mysticisme, arts, etc.) sont invités à participer.
 
Deadline for abstracts: 30 October 2016. Information: http://calenda.org/373427
 
 
______________
 
 
POSITIONS
 
8. 3 PhD candidates in Middle East Studies (Arabic), Leiden University 
 
The 3 PhD candidates (Vacancy number: 16-252) will carry out research in the
framework of the ERC-funded project, “Embedding Conquest: Naturalising Muslim Rule
in the Early Islamic Empire (600-1000)” headed by Prof. Dr. Petra Sijpesteijn. The
PhD candidates will use the vastly important but largely neglected documentary
evidence from the Muslim world. This is a full-time post from 1 February 2017 until
31 January 2021. 
 
Deadline for application: 14 September 2016. Contact: 
. Information on LIAS Department:
http://www.hum.leiden.edu/lias/
 
 
______________
 
 
9. Assistant Professor of Political Science Specializing in Comparative Politics,
Stockton University, Galloway, NJ
 
Starting Date: September 2017. Ability to offer courses in one or more of the
following areas is desired – Political Economy of Development, Nationalism and
Ethnic Conflict, Politics in the Developing World, Gender and Politics,
Environmental Politics, Comparative Law, Democratization, or Regional Integration.
Regional focus is open. 
 
Review of applications will begin 28 September 2016. Information:
http://www.isanet.org/Programs/Job-Board/mid/9461/EntryDetail
 
 
______________
 
 
10. Assistant Professor, Modern Middle Eastern History, University of Massachusetts
Amherst 
 
Requirements: A Ph.D. in History or a closely related/relevant field is required at
the time of hire, 1 September 2017.
 
Deadline for application: 14 October 2016. Information:
https://umass.interviewexchange.com/jobofferdetails.jsp;jsessionid=00FEB28D58202294C22CB4EE73E10409?JOBID=74277
 
 
______________
 
 
11. Assistant Professor or Instructor in the History of the Islamic World/Middle
East (tenure-track),  Franklin & Marshall College, Lancaster, Pennsylvania
 
The position is beginning Fall 2017. Applicants should possess or be close to
completing a doctoral degree. The successful candidate will teach courses at all
levels in the history of the Islamic World and the modern Middle East.
 
Deadline for application: 15 November 2016. Information:
https://apply.interfolio.com/36412
 
 
______________
 
 
12. Faculty Positions for Social Research and Public Policy, New York University,
Abu Dhabi
 
Applications are invited from sociologists and related disciplines for faculty
positions at any level (assistant, associate or full professor, tenure/tenure
track). We will consider applicants with an active research agenda in all areas of
theoretically-informed social research. Employment will start 15 August 2017.
 
Deadline for application: 1 September 2016. Information on the curriculum
http://nyuad.nyu.edu/academics/undergraduate-programs/majors/social-research-and-public-policy.html;
contact:  
 
 
______________
 
 
OTHER INFORMATION
 
13. Articles on “Frontiers of Contemporary Research on the Middle East and North
Africa” for "APSA MENA Newsletter"
 
This newsletter is emerging from the MENA Workshops of the American Political
Science Association (APSA), a community-building initiative designed to serve as a
platform for Political Science researchers interested in the Middle East and North
Africa. For the first issue, we invite topics related, but not limited to, emerging
research fields, challenges during fieldwork and methodological issues.
 
Deadline for submissions of 800-1000 words is 1 October 2016. Information: 
. 
 

dimanche 14 août 2016

The Normans in the South: Mediterranean Meetings in the Central Middle Ages 2017

Call for Papers – The Normans in the South: Mediterranean Meetings in the Central Middle Ages

The Normans in the South
Mediterranean Meetings in the Central Middle Ages
Friday 30 June – Sunday 2 July 2017
St Edmund Hall, University of Oxford
By some accounts, 1017 marked the advent of the Norman presence in Italy and Sicily, inaugurating a new era of invasion, interaction and integration in the Mediterranean. Whether or not we decide the millennial anniversary is significant, the moment offers an ideal opportunity to explore the story in the south, about a thousand years ago. To what extent did the Normans establish a cross-cultural empire? What can we learn by comparing the impact of the Norman presence in different parts of Europe? What insights are discoverable in comparing local histories of Italy and Sicily with broader historical ideas about transformation, empire and exchange? The conference aims to draw together established, early-career and post-graduate scholars for a joint investigation of the Normans in the south, to explore together the many meetings of cultural, political and religious ideas in the Mediterranean in the central Middle Ages.
Keynote SpeakersProfessor Graham Loud (University of Leeds)
Professor Jeremy Johns (University of Oxford)
Professor Sandro Carocci (University of Rome II)
Call for Papers
Proposals for three-paper sessions, as well as individual proposals for 20-minute papers, are welcome. Comparative studies are particularly encouraged. Submissions should include: an abstract of 200–300 words, paper title, name and academic position, institutional affiliation and durable contact details for all speakers.
Themes and topics could include:
  • Sicily as a cultural crossroads
  • Crusading
  • The Normans and empire
  • Islamic interactions
  • Political leadership
  • Social change: women, men and families
  • Norman Conquests compared: Italy, Sicily and other parts of Europe
  • Reactions to the Norman presence in the south, then and now
  • Impact on Italy as a whole
  • Migration
  • Local history: micro-perspectives on macro-trends
Submission Deadline: 15 November 2016
Please direct paper and session proposals, requests to join the conference mailing list, ideas for themes, and all other enquiries to:
Dr Emily A. Winkler
emily.winkler@history.ox.ac.uk
conference sponsored by
www.haskinssociety.org